Lessons from English Gardens for Americans #4: Fabulous Foliage

Number four in a continuing series.

Flower, flowers, flowers. “Does it flower?” I am always asked. And while flowers most certainly are important (though for me, they must have fragrance, but that’s a column for another day) what generally gives you much more long-lasting bang for your buck is foliage.

foliageLook at the picture above. It’s a tiny part of the magnificent cathedral garden at Wells (a must see, by the way.) Sure, there are a few flowers visible, but what’s most striking is the gorgeous blue of the large-leaf hosta (‘Blue Hawaii’, I believe) combined with the thick green waxy leaves of the bergenia. Almost out of sight, to the left, is the green and yellow variegation of acuba japonica. The combination of these leaf colors entirely steals the show, drawing the eye to delightful rest in this cool corner of the garden.

hostaHosta, of course, are one of the all-around best plants for foliage, and they come in a strikingly large range of colors, sizes, shapes and textures. (The crinkling pattern certain cultivars exhibit is called ‘crenelation’ for those who like to pay attention to such things.) Interestingly, I was talking to the owner of the exhibit (left) at London’s Chelsea Flower Show, and he was telling me that selling hostas is an uphill battle in England. “Why?” I asked. “Slugs!” he answered, “They love our hosta as much as our wet English weather.” “Oh that’s simply resolved,” I replied. “Get a few ducks! I let mine wander around the yard and they eat every bug, slug, worm or caterpillar they can find.” I think he thought I was crazy, but it’s true. Since I have allowed the ducks free reign, there has hardly been a crawling bug in sight. Nor do they do the damage the chickens do, scratching up the beds. For those of you with no ducks, slug pellets do the trick, as does a simple can of beer, opened and buried in the ground with the top open to the sky, and three-quarters of the content poured out. Slugs love beer, and quickly come to a very liquid end. (I probably should have told him that too, but the Brits already know so much more about gardening than we do I wasn’t of a mind to surrender any more of our limited competitive advantage.)

churchmouseThe little green charmer in the center of the display, and highlighted at right here, is a new variety I had not seen before, ‘Churchmouse,’ which had the mostly interesting, almost succulent green leaves. The picture doesn’t it do it justice: I watched as person after person couldn’t help but reach out and stoke the leaves. I intend to track down ‘Churchmouse’ for my own garden this year.

So what’s the quick take-away from all this? There’s more to color than flowers, and you should always be thinking of ways to maximize the textural, sculptural and color advantages foliage has to offer.


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