Lessons from English Gardens for Americans #1: Beautiful Lawns

Last year I was lucky enough to spend over a month touring the gardens of England and Scotland. Looking over the pictures the other day, I realized there were many wonderful, easy, lessons to be learned from some of the gardens we visited, so I thought I would introduce you to a few of these while we patiently (or impatiently) await the start of spring.

lawnsToday’s tip is about why English lawns always seem so much more beautiful than American lawns. Of course there is the issue of climate: grass does far better in cool and damp than hot and dry. But it’s more than that: it’s the care that’s taken in their construction that sets British lawns apart. Take a look at the picture above. It’s the garden of a wonderful inn in Shaftsbury where we stopped to have lunch. In particular though, notice how the grass plat seems to float above the ground like some magic carpet. The fact is that the lawn area has been very carefully graded, pitched and edged so that that it sheds excess water — very important in a wet climate. Grass doesn’t like wet feet; if water accumulates, especially over the winter, it’s over and out. So, if you are installing or renovating a lawn this season, be sure to prepare the base very carefully with at least 8 inches of thick, rich soil, which is then carefully graded and pitched to shed water, and, like the example above, is sufficiently raised at the edges to allow for the inevitable rise in the level of the planting beds from mulch and compost. Oh, and get a water filled roller, and roll the new seed bed (or sod) while planting. This assures a firm, even bed later.


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